Gender Based Violence

Exploring new ways to improve the monitoring and evaluation of GBV interventions in humaitarian settings

Developing Real-Time Monitoring Tools

We develop real-time monitoring tools that easily integrate into the humanitarian system to enable the real-time collection of GBV ( Gender Based Violence ) data during an emergency.

The data collected is reliable and support GBV decision-making and the design of GBV programmes.

This helps in strengthening capacities of gender based violence service providers to deliver quality survivor centred care.

It improves quality and accessibility of gender based violence related services during humanitarian crisis.

Thi initiative increase awareness of the scope of the problem and its impact and improve services for survivors of violence,

We are also aimed at strengthening prevention efforts and strengthening of accountability mechanism to follow up and evaluate the implementation of laws addressing prevention and response to GBV Our innovative idea will focus on responses to violence and prevention efforts.

We have come up with an internet based application called GBV ALERT that incorporate a function such as a panic button to enable women to report any form of harassment and assault in real time, The application would be also designed to work offline for the users to be able to retrieve data in real time. As this application is designed to work on a smartphone, most women in our target area have access to mobile technology.

The mobile app is currently in the design stage to notify the next of kin and emergency services. It will assist in collecting real time data, generating &; analysing reports, In addition, as an awareness campaigns, we would launch a Say No to GBV stickers. The public transport providers, shop owners ,restaurants, schools, colleges, universities, shopping malls and other public spaces will be encouraged to display Say No to GBV stickers to challenge any form of violence as it happens with clear procedures to inspire them to use GBV ALERT mobile application, toll free & sms numbers. This will enable members of the public to report an incident of GBV in real time and anonymously so. This idea will improve the monitoring and evaluation of GBV interventions in humanitarian settings. Data will be accessed in real time, follow-ups will be programmed.

The information collected will help to realign, adjust, improve and institutionalise GBV programs which are better than what already exist.We will validate and demonstrate that our idea works using the following methods; Site visits to the shelters, meeting the affected families, sending out the questionnaire during workshops, we will also do some site visits to the Community Policing Forum. We would collect most of the data from our developed software mobile application, police stations, hospitals, clinics. We would need GBV reported cases, we would also collect the data from the existing organisation dealing with GBV such as the CPF, SDC, Shelters, NGOs and their affiliates and networks.

THOMI AFRICA joined the international community in commemorating 16 Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence, which began on Friday, November 25 (International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women) and ends on December 10 (International Human Rights Day). This years theme is From Peace in the Home to Peace in the World: Make Education Safe for All.

In collaboration with our partners, THOMI AFRICA works to eliminate gender-based violence and secure educational opportunities for girls across the globe. Gender-based violence undermines the health, security and dignity of women and girls, increasing their vulnerability to HIV, sexually transmitted infections, unsafe pregnancies and mental health issues. Education is crucial to lifting people out of poverty, improving living standards and quality of life, and reducing health and safety risks. For instance, more than half of the reduction in child deaths since 1970 can be linked to the increased educational attainment of reproductive-age women. However, many women and girls around the world still face difficulties in accessing education safely. During these 16 days, let us reflect and act collectively to end gender-based violence, helping ensure that people around the world can reach their full potential and lead healthy, prosperous lives.

THOMI AFRICA joined the international community in commemorating 16 Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence, which began on Friday, November 25 (International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women) and ends on December 10 (International Human Rights Day). This years theme is From Peace in the Home to Peace in the World: Make Education Safe for All.

In collaboration with our partners, THOMI AFRICA works to eliminate gender-based violence and secure educational opportunities for girls across the globe. Gender-based violence undermines the health, security and dignity of women and girls, increasing their vulnerability to HIV, sexually transmitted infections, unsafe pregnancies and mental health issues. Education is crucial to lifting people out of poverty, improving living standards and quality of life, and reducing health and safety risks. For instance, more than half of the reduction in child deaths since 1970 can be linked to the increased educational attainment of reproductive-age women. However, many women and girls around the world still face difficulties in accessing education safely. During these 16 days, let us reflect and act collectively to end gender-based violence, helping ensure that people around the world can reach their full potential and lead healthy, prosperous lives.

Gender violence ‘a reality in South Africa

According to Gender Links’ research, 77% percent of women in Limpopo province, 51% of women in Gauteng, 45% of women in the Western Cape and 36% of women in KwaZulu-Natal have experienced some form of violence (emotional, economic, physical or sexual) in their lifetime, both within and outside intimate relationships. A higher proportion of men in Gauteng (76%) and KwaZulu-Natal (41%) admitted to perpetrating violence against women in their lifetime, while a slightly lower proportion of men – compared to the proportion of women reporting GBV – said they perpetrated GBV in Limpopo (48%) and Western Cape (35%), the research found. “Comparing what women say they experience to what men say they do confirms that gender violence is a reality in South Africa,

Activities to combat Gender Based Violence

Activities to help prevent and combat gender-based violence are run through the GBV Alerts field operations. These include technical expertise to legislative reform processes; support for victims access to justice; training for police officers, medical authorities, judges, prosecutors, and lawyers; assistance for telephone hotlines and womens resources centres that provide legal and psychosocial support to victims, and sharing of experience through roundtable meetings and study tours.